Thursday, July 25

Sports

Miles Russell, 15, made his PGA Tour debut. He was strangely normal
Sports

Miles Russell, 15, made his PGA Tour debut. He was strangely normal

Related media - News 24 hours DETROIT – Miles Russell’s pants didn’t quite fit during the first round of the Rocket Mortgage Classic on Thursday. A recent growth spurt has left the 15-year-old, now 5 feet 7 inches, in pants designed for someone shorter. Russell, who weighs 120 pounds and has a 28-inch waist, showed off his ankles as he strolled around Detroit Golf Club. Russell made his PGA Tour debut, shooting a 2-over 74. Born in 2009, he signed autographs for kids and adults while being followed by a PGA Tour Live camera. He teed off for 7,370 yards and played alongside the top-ranked players. The most unusual part? Everything seemed surprisingly normal. This year, two 16-year-olds have already played in PGA Tour events. Last year, 15-year-old Oliver Betschart qualified f...
Orlando Cepeda, Baseball’s ‘Baby Bull,’ Dies at 86
Sports

Orlando Cepeda, Baseball’s ‘Baby Bull,’ Dies at 86

More news - News 24 hours Orlando Cepeda, the second Puerto Rican-born player to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, died Friday at the age of 86. The San Francisco Giants announced his death but did not disclose a location. Cepeda played 17 MLB seasons, mostly as a first baseman, hitting 379 home runs, hitting 2,351 hits and driving in 1,365 runs with a .297 batting average. He was the National League Rookie of the Year in 1958 and the MVP in 1967, helping the St. Louis Cardinals win the World Series that year. He batted over .300 in nine seasons and appeared in nine All-Star Games. His father, Pedro, known as "The Bull," was a famous professional player in Puerto Rico. Orlando earned the nickname "Baby Bull" and inspired future stars like Juan Marichal. Cepeda's reputation ...
The South Florida Heat and Panthers chase NBA and NHL titles
Sports

The South Florida Heat and Panthers chase NBA and NHL titles

More news - Breaking news Lifelong friends Martin Schwartz and Matthew Mandel enjoy a rare sports moment as Miami teams compete for championships. Martin Schwartz and Matthew Mandel are living a dream come true. The lifelong friends and South Florida residents have hit the sports jackpot with the Miami Heat and Florida Panthers both making it to the finals, competing for NBA and NHL titles at the same time. Schwartz and Mandel, who have shared season tickets to both teams for years, have seen their fair share of ups and downs. They've endured tough seasons, like the Heat's 15-win campaign in 2007-08, and seen visiting fans dominate the stands. They celebrated the Heat's championship successes in 2012 and 2013, led by Dwyane Wade and LeBron James, and enjoyed the Panthers' occasiona...
Emerald Ash Weevil Strikes Ash Bats in Major League Baseball
Sports

Emerald Ash Weevil Strikes Ash Bats in Major League Baseball

More news - News 24 hours Imagine a baseball season without the iconic crack of an ash bat. That could be a reality thanks to the ash beetle, a small beetle that is causing massive destruction of ash trees across North America. For decades, ash has reigned supreme in baseball bats. From legendary players like Babe Ruth to modern sluggers like Mark McGwire, ash has been the go-to material for feel and performance. Companies like Hillerich & Bradsby, maker of the Louisville Slugger, produced hundreds of thousands of ash bats each year. However, the emerald ash borer has changed the game. This invasive insect, about the size of a grain of rice, attacks ash trees by laying eggs under the bark. The larvae then feed on the tree’s vital nutrients, eventually killing it. Since arriving in th...
The mind is available, so the body doesn’t have much choice
Sports

The mind is available, so the body doesn’t have much choice

More news - News 24 hours Mike Duggan and his hockey buddies were strapping on their gear one recent morning when their banter turned, as it often does, to the topic of joint replacement surgeries. Duggan, 74, the proud owner of an artificial hip, marveled at the sheer number of titanium body parts in the locker room. He nodded toward Mitch Boriskin, who was putting on a pair of skates along the opposite wall. “I don't think there's an original part to you,” Duggan said. Boriskin, 70, smiled. “Two fake knees, a spinal cord stimulator, 25 surgeries,” he began, as if he were reciting a sheet of music. “And a lobotomy,” Duggan chimed in, as laughter rippled through the room. All that titanium, at least, was being put to good use. Their team, Oregon Old Growth, had joined dozens of ot...
Caitlin Clark finally gets it right, but she has to consider the agenda around her name
Sports

Caitlin Clark finally gets it right, but she has to consider the agenda around her name

More news - News 24 hours INDIANAPOLIS — Athletes often speak in general terms as a defense mechanism. Rather than delve into a potentially controversial topic, or even address the issue, they provide non-answers, using clichés and pre-planned talking points to stay at a safe distance. Part of me would like to believe that this is what Caitlin Clark did Thursday morning when I asked her if she was bothered by fans using her name as a weapon in the culture wars dividing the country. The Indiana Fever's star guard hasn't closed the door on the topic; she refused to even open it. “No,” he declared. "I don't see it. I don't see it. That's not where my focus is. My focus is here and on basketball. That's where it needs to be, that's where it's been, and I'm just trying to get better e...
Fifty years later, the chaos of Cleveland’s 10-Cent Beer Night still shocks
Sports

Fifty years later, the chaos of Cleveland’s 10-Cent Beer Night still shocks

Related media - Latest news There were streakers, kissers and wannabe prize fighters. There were arrests, threats and flying chairs. There were bruises, there was blood and there was beer. So, so much beer. There was plenty of blame to pass around: the fans, the umpires, the team officials, the managers, local broadcasters and radio hosts. Oh, and according to one Cleveland resident, the real instigator causing that evening’s mayhem? The moon. And that’s not a reference to the fans who yanked down their pants and showed Rangers players their backsides. Fifty years ago, chaos descended upon Municipal Stadium on 10-Cent Beer Night. Now, the infamous events of June 4, 1974, when an alcohol-fueled crowd spilled onto the field, confronted players and forced a forfeit, are often v...
John Jaso gave up baseball to enjoy life on a boat
Sports

John Jaso gave up baseball to enjoy life on a boat

Related media - Recent news He also took several trips to Europe, discovering a passion for exploring his father's ancestral land in the Basque Country in northern Spain. And he drove a camper van around Australia and Indonesia. But the boat was his greatest pleasure. “I want my life to be simple and there's nothing simpler than being on a sailboat,” she said. “You treat the boat well and it treats you well. That's all. Before the pandemic, the Roaming Rose docked in Turks and Caicos. Due to travel restrictions, she was stuck there for nearly two years. When he was allowed to return to the boat in 2022, she took her girlfriend, Jayden Davila, with her for a three-month sail around the Caribbean. They docked in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and the...
Black baseball history takes center stage in the Hall of Fame
Sports

Black baseball history takes center stage in the Hall of Fame

More news - Latest news After the reinstatement, Major League Baseball executives established an unwritten quota system that limits the number of Black players on rosters, Shieber said. “This led to unbalanced trading,” he added. “It's not just a one-to-one exchange. Like, “We have enough black player trades.” Toward the end of the exhibit, Shieber pointed out the locker once used by Willie Mays, who Barry Bonds took over as a player for the San Francisco Giants. One of Stewart's fondest early memories involves meeting Mays, his favorite player, when he was 5 years old. But Stewart might also look up to Gibson, Aaron, Frank Robinson and a host of other black stars. Today, he said, kids probably emulate Betts. He struggled to name another current American-born black star. Below th...
The NHL’s move to Salt Lake City is the latest downsizing of the sport
Sports

The NHL’s move to Salt Lake City is the latest downsizing of the sport

More news - Breaking news Sometimes, smaller is better. For decades, major sports leagues have sought to place teams in the country's largest markets, in hopes of selling more tickets and sponsorships, as well as satisfying broadcasters who want to reach as many viewers as possible. But in recent years, leagues have embraced the allure of smaller markets. Teams moved to cities like Oklahoma City, Las Vegas, and Winnipeg, Manitoba, seeking financial incentives, newer arenas and stadiums, and more devoted fans. In early April, the National Hockey League approved the $1.2 billion sale of the Arizona Coyotes to tech billionaire Ryan Smith and his wife Ashley. The team, which will be renamed, will begin play next season at the Delta Center in Salt Lake City, home of another Smiths team,...